Bosnian cuisine

Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina (61) - Moussaka served at Nanina Kuhinja

Food & Drink

Multicultural cuisine

Bosnian cuisine is rich in eastern and western influences and it’s closely linked to Turkish, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking. While in Bosnia you should try a variety of dishes (most based on mince meat) you wouldn’t be able to taste anywhere else in Europe. In Bosnia you can really eat well on a budget!

Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina (62) - Bosanski Lonac served at Nanina Kuhinja. Bosnian cuisine

Bosanski Lonac served at Nanina Kuhinja, Sarajevo

The most popular dishes are ćevapčići (grilled mince meat sausages in bread, called the Balkan kebab) and burek (also popular in other Balkan states) which is a greasy and filling pastry stuffed with meat, cheese or other things.

Ćevapčići in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Bosnian cuisine

Ćevapčići in Mostar

Another popular dish is pljeskavica which looks like a large burger, combined of at least two different kinds of mince meat and served with chips and salads.

Filovana paprika are tasty bell peppers stuffed with mince meal. Sarma is meat and rice rolled in pickled cabbage leaves. While in Sarajevo, you should try musaka – a baked dish made of layers of potatoes (or cabbage or egg plant) and minced beef. Bosanski Lonac (Bosnian Pot) is meat stew cooked over open fire in ceramic pots.

Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina (61) - Moussaka served at Nanina Kuhinja. Bosnian cuisine

Moussaka served at Nanina Kuhinja, Sarajevo

Džigerica is fried liver, usually served with chips and salads.

Džigerica - fried liver in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Bosnian cuisine

Džigerica in Mostar

Turkish style Baklava and halva are popular desserts.

What to drink?

When it comes to drinks, Bosnian people like Turkish coffee (called in Bosnia Bosnian coffee’ of course). Roasted and finely ground coffee beans are boiled, usually with sugar, in a small copper pot (džezva) and served in small espresso-type cups where the sediments are allowed to settle. So remember not to down your coffee while in Bosnia.

Turkish ayran is also relatively popular, which is cold and salty drinking yogurt served with food.

Bosnian Serbs and Croats also drink rakija (Balkan fruit brandy) and beer (Sarajevsko, Nektar).

One of the few Bosnian people who picked us up. Bosnian cuisine

Socialising with one of our divers in Jajce

written by: Ania

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